Historical Sites

Angel Orensanz Center

172 Norfolk St.

212-529-7194

The Center is housed in the oldest synagogue building in New York. Built in 1849, the historic structure was built in the German-Romantic tradition. The structure has 54-foot ceilings and now serves as a spiritual and cultural center. Call for an appointment to visit the space.
www.orensanz.org

Beth Hamedrash Hagadol

60 Norfolk Street

212-374-4100

Call the Lower East Side Conservancy for an appointment.

A Gothic Revival structure erected in 1852; a New York City landmark. This synagogue was originally a Baptist church, and now it houses the oldest Russian Jewish congregation in the United States.

CONGREGATION CHASAM SOPHER

8-10 Clinton Street

212-777-5140

Call for appointment Built in 1853, this synagogue was originally a German- Jewish congregation. In 1892 two Polish congregations merged to form the still-active Congregation Chasam Sopher.

www.chasamsopher.org

DIXON PLACE

161A Chrystie Street

212-219-0736

Mon–Sat 6pm–1am

Dixon Place is a 27 year old non-profit organization that provides a space for artists to create and develop new works in front of a live audience. DP is the only theater on the LES with a full cocktail lounge. Every drink you buy supports our artists and mission!

www.dixonplace.org

twitter.com/DixonPlace

facebook.com/dixonplace

Essex Street Market

120 Essex Street

212-388-0449

Monday-Saturday from 8am-6pm

The market has been serving the community for over 50 years selling fresh meats, produce and other products. The market was created by Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia to bring pushcart vendors together indoors. Click here for photos of today's Essex Street Market. 
www.essexstreetmarket.com

Essex Street Market

Mon–Sat 8am–7pm; Sun 10am–6pm A neighborhood landmark N since 1939, the Market’s vendors offer fresh foods, T ethnic delicacies and other goods and services at unbeatable prices. Managed RE by the New York City

212-388044

A neighborhood landmark N since 1939, the Market’svendors offer fresh foods,  ethnic delicacies and othergoods and services at unbeatable prices. Managed RE by the New York City-.

Henry Street Settlement

265 Henry Street
 (at the corner of Montgomery Street, one block east of Henry Street)

212-766-9200


Since its founding in 1893 by social work pioneer Lillian D. Wald, Henry Street has met continuously the needs of its Lower East Side neighbors. Today, Henry Street offers a wealth of social services and cultural programs, including educational and recreational opportunities for youth, shelters and transitional housing, workforce development programs, mental health services, services for seniors and home-bound individuals, and a multi-disciplinary arts programming at its Abrons Arts Center. Henry Street's Abrons Arts Center is one of the first arts facilities in the nation designed for a predominantly low-income population. Located at 466 Grand Street, the Center hosts year-round classes for children and adults, as well as arts-in-ducation programming in public schools, artists-in-residence opportunities and regular performances and gallery exhibits.
www.henrystreet.org
info@henrystreet.org

Henry Street Settlement Abrons Arts Center

466 Grand Street, at the corner of Pitt Street (one block east of Ridge Street))

212-598-0400

Tues-Sat 10am - 10pm; Sun 11am-6pm

Abrons is home to the national historic landmark Playhouse, two additional theaters, two galleries, and artist studios. Bringing contemporary and experimental performance to the Lower East Side. Abrons also hosts a range of art exhibitions and offers training in music, dance, theater, and visual arts to children and adults. www.abronsartscenter.org

Jarmulovsky's Bank Building

54/58 Canal Street

Erected in 1895, this building was the tallest structure on the Lower East Side at the time. Founded by Sender Jarmulovsky who, literally, went from rags to riches (he began his "career" on Hester Street, selling rags from a pushcart), the bank collapsed after the pre-World War I panic, when depositors rushed to withdraw funds to help relatives in Europe.

Kehila Kedosha Janina Synagogue and Museum

280 Broome Street

212-431-1619

Opened in 1927 to serve individuals of Greek-Romaniote descent. The Landmark synagogue is the only one of its kind in the Western Hemisphere. Open to the Public on Sundays 11am-4pm or call for appointment.
www.kkjsm.org
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