INTERNATIONAL PICKLE DAY PRESERVES LOWER EAST SIDE’S RICH FOOD HISTORY

LOWER EAST SIDE, NY, August 20, 2010 — It’s ON! The Tenth Annual NYC International Pickle Day is set for Sunday, October 17th, 2010 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the parking lot on Broome Street (between Essex and Ludlow), as well as on Broome Street (between Orchard and Ludlow), in the heart of the old Pickle District of the Lower East Side. A favorite of foodies, history buffs and savvy locals, Pickle Day is easy to get to by foot, subway, bus or bike (with free valet bike parking). Each year, Pickle Day becomes more diverse, informative, creative, exciting and delicious, with exhibitions, music, activities and cooking demonstrations. Hosts NY Food Museum (www.nyfoodmuseum.org), the Lower East Side Business Improvement District (www.LowerEastSideNY.com) and GrowNYC Greenmarkets (http://www.cenyc.org/greenmarket) welcome everyone to one of the most popular food events in New York, with anticipated attendance between 15,000 and 20,000. This year the Umami Food and Art Festival will curate performance and art. There will be activities for kids of all ages, and, of course, free pickle samples from around the world. The event is free and open to
the public.

In its historical heyday, the Lower East Side neighborhood was home to well over 100 pickle businesses helped supply pickles to New York City. Now, pickle adventurers can taste radishes, tomatoes, okra, cabbage, lettuce, fish, meat, carrots, beans, onions, eggs, limes, mangos, beets — a host of foods creatively and traditionally preserved in brine, a perfect balance of new and old enterprises.  “The tenth annual event is special,” explains Nancy Ralph, NY Food Museum Director. “We have always depended on the contributions of a multitude of volunteers and the hard work and innovations of picklers – full of improvisation and creativity – and the enthusiasm of everyone who has come to the festival over the years has created real community. It’s a truly international event, celebrating the diversity and culinary traditions of all New Yorkers. Pickle Day illustrates what makes New York one of the greatest cities in the world – diversity, love, and pickles!”

The festival is under sturdy tents and goes on rain or shine. “Pickle Day highlights some of the important food history of the Lower East Side,” says Bob Zuckerman, Executive Director of the LES BID. “This is a watershed year for Pickle Day, and we are working to make the event better than ever. We hope people come to make a day of it, discover the great value in our new and long-standing restaurants and do a little shopping in the Lower East Side’s fantastic boutiques and specialty stores.”

ABOUT NY FOOD MUSEUM

The NY Food Museum is a ten-year-old non-profit organization dedicated to encouraging people to think about the food they eat.  Past programs include “The History of the School Lunch Program” held at the St. George Ferry Terminal and “Cooking for the Lower East Side” in partnership with the Henry Street Settlement.  Online exhibitions include “Over Spilt Milk” and “How NYC Ate 100 Years Ago,” Those interested in sponsoring Pickle Day should call 212-966-0191 or email nyfoodmuse@gmail.com. For online exhibits, see www.nyfoodmuseum.org.

ABOUT THE LOWER EAST SIDE BID (LES BID)

Established in 1992, the Lower East Side Business Improvement District (LES BID, www.LowerEastSideNY.com) is a non-profit economic development organization created to revitalize the Orchard Street Shopping District while preserving its unique and diverse character. Today, the LES BID is a community of over 500 merchants and property owners managed by a Board of Directors and consisting of local merchants, property owners, residents and elected officials. The LES BID promotes the local businesses, develops events, and provides community beautification services. LES is More. Explore.